Honeybees in the pink

  • September 3, 2016 6:10 pm

Bees are a real running theme for me this year, I just can’t resist the challenge of photographing these beautiful creatures. But they really are tricky to take pictures of. They are constantly moving, even when lapping the nectar from my Sedum plant in the garden, and in macro photography even the tiniest movements make all the difference. They really are fascinating and frustrating in equal measure. But it’s a pleasure really, to study these gorgeous glowing marmalade orange insects going about their business.

Honey bee, Apis mellifera, feeding on sedum, Norfolk, August, UK

Honey bee, Apis mellifera, feeding on sedum, Norfolk, August, UK

Honey bee, Apis mellifera, feeding on sedum, Norfolk, August, UK

The Honeybees arrive in the garden later in the day than the larger Bumblebees, so during an early start I found some other insects to photograph, like this young Green Shield Bug, which was lurking on my rose bush.

Green Shield Bug, Palomena prasina, young, on rose leaf, garden, Autumn, Norfolk

This odd and tiny little creature is a Mint Moth, which normally flutters around the Marjoram in the border, but I found it sunning itself on the Sedum before the bees arrived.

Mint Moth, Pyrausta aurata, on sedum, garden, Autumn, Norfolk

Honey bee, Apis mellifera, feeding on sedum, Norfolk, August, UK

You know you’ve been out in the sun for too long when you start to recognise individual bees!

 

(Click images to view larger…)

If you like what you see, please consider sharing!


UK & Eire Natural History Bloggers

Follow me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DawnMonroseNaturePhotography

Yellow and Green

  • August 2, 2016 8:50 pm

Oh the exquisite British Summer, hot, sunny and humid for a week or two then back to the dreary drizzle of rain. The slugs in my garden are alarmingly huge this year, and they have eaten their way through most of my bee friendly flowers, but the little patch of Golden Rod I’ve left is still living and attracting hoverflies and honey bees like this one. Such handsome glowing golden creatures and vital pollinators.

Honey bee, Apis mellifera, feeding on Golden Rod, garden, Norfolk, July, Summer

My local common has a fantastic array of wildflowers however,  perhaps the dry sandy breckland soil helps to control those slugs. Beautiful blue harebells nodding amongst the grass, tall purple flowered thistles attracting Bumblebees and the yellow suns of Ragwort glowing alongside the path. Highly toxic, Ragwort is normally pulled up, but here some is left for the marvellous Cinnabar moth caterpillars which feast upon the poisonous plant, making themselves unpalatable to predators as a method of defence. These smart caterpillars in their stripy jumpers warn of their distastefulness with their stunning black and yellow colouration.

Cinnabar moth caterpillar, Tyria jacobaeae, feeding on Ragwort, Norfolk, July, Summer

Cinnabar moth caterpillar, Tyria jacobaeae, feeding on Ragwort, Norfolk, July, Summer

Cinnabar moth caterpillar, Tyria jacobaeae, feeding on Ragwort, Norfolk, July, Summer

Cinnabar moth caterpillar, Tyria jacobaeae, feeding on Ragwort, Norfolk, July, Summer, Hoverfly on flower

 

(Click images to view larger…)

If you like what you see, please consider sharing!


UK & Eire Natural History Bloggers

Follow me on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DawnMonroseNaturePhotography

Follow

Get every new post on this blog delivered to your Inbox.

Join other followers: