The Dawn Chorus

  • May 7, 2014 8:37 pm

I got up this Sunday morning early enough to hear the start of the dawn chorus. The Song Thrush began, backed by the local Blackbirds, then Robins and Wrens. A Blue tit joins in with a simple trill, and a Woodpigeon adds his two penny worth too. Their voices merge into a wall of beautiful sound. The effect from my elevated position was that of a crescendo of bird song drifting up to the sky.

Down on the fen, the Cuckoo was in full voice, in the still, cool morning air his song echoed across the reserve. A flurry of silvery notes come from one of my favourite songsters, the Blackcap, and a scratchy buzz followed by a fluty warble gives away a Sedge Warbler’s position in the reeds.

Sedgewarbler040514DM9219

 Whilst there, I also managed to film a Cuckoo singing, take a look here: Cuckoo Singing

 

(Click images to view larger…)

If you like what you see, please consider sharing!


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Footprints in the mud

  • February 2, 2014 5:17 pm

Winter is a great time for searching for tracks and signs of animals. These prints appeared in the garden recently, and setting up the remote camera showed they belonged to a rather handsome Muntjac deer. He’s a regular night time visitor now, finishing up the apple I put out for the Blackbirds.

Muntjac deer, Muntiacus reevesi, foot print, slot, track,  in mud, Norfolk,

Muntjac deer, Muntiacus reevesi, foot print, slot, track,  in mud, Norfolk,

Take a look at the video here:

Muntjac in the garden

 

(Click images to view larger…)

If you like what you see, please consider sharing!


UK & Eire Natural History Bloggers

 

Current favourite books, click for more info:




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